DEAD HEROES SOCIETY

PHL

We may be dead but our ideals are alive and we are kicking bad asses.

"InDios We Trust!"

Manifesto to certain Filipinos

                                     

                                                        

Fellow countrymen: Upon my return from Spain I learned that my name was being used
as a rallying cry by some who had taken up arms. This information surprised and grieved
me but thinking that the whole affair was finished, I refrained from commenting on
something that could no longer be remedied.
 

 Now, rumours reach me that the disturbances have not ceased. 

It may be that persons continue to use my name in good or in bad faith; if so, wishing to put a stop to this abuse and to undeceive the gullible, I hasten to address these lines to you that the truth may be known. From the very beginning, when I first received information of what was being planned, I opposed it, I fought against it, and I made clear that it was absolutely impossible.

This is the truth, and they are still alive who can bear witness to my words. I was convinced that the very idea was wholly absurd —worse than absurd — it was disastrous. I did more than this. When later on, in spite of my urgings, the uprising broke out, I came forward voluntarily to offer not only my services
but my life and even my good name in order that they may use me in any manner they may think opportune to smother the rebellion. For I was convinced of the evils which that rebellion would bring in its train, and so I considered it a privilege if at whatever sacrifice I could ward off so much useless suffering. This is also of record.

Fellow countrymen: I have given many proofs that I desire as much as the next man liberties for our country; I continue to desire them. But I laid down as a prerequisite the education of the people in order that by means of such instruction, and by hard work, they may acquire a personality of their own and so become worthy of such liberties. In my writings I have recommended study and the civic virtues, without which no redemption is possible. I have also written (and my words have been repeated by others) that reforms, if they are to bear fruit, must come from above, for reforms that come from below are upheavals both violent and transitory. Thoroughly imbued with these ideas, I cannot do less than condemn, as I do condemn, this ridiculous and barbarous uprising, plotted behind my back, which both dishonours us Filipinos and discredits those who might have taken our part. I abominate the crimes for which it is responsible and I will have no part in it.

 With all my heart I am sorry for those who have rashly allowed themselves to be deceived. Let them, then, return to their homes, and may  God pardon those who have acted in bad faith.

 

 

 Jose P.Rizal

culturalcenterphilippines:

Tanghalang Pilipino
NOLI ME TANGERE: THE MUSICAL

For tickets and inquiries, please contact:
Tanghalang Pilipino: (02)832-3661
Ticketworld: (02)891-9999
ONLINE: http://form.jotform.com/form/11494617630

(Source: tanghalangpilipino.org, via culturalcenterphils)

culturalcenterphilippines:

Ramon Obusan Folkloric GroupSAYAW AT GALAW RIZALIANASayaw at Galaw Rizaliana is ROFG’s contribution to the nation’s celebration of Jose Rizal’s  150th birth anniversary. Drawing from the vast research of the late  National Artist  for Dance, Ramon Arevalo Obusan, the performances will  showcase through songs and dances the milieu Rizal was familiar with —  from his childhood to his travels and writings.Time: 8pmDate: 05 AugustTime: 3pmDate: 06-07 AugustVenue: Tanghalang Nicanor Abelardo (CCP Main Theater)
For tickets and inquiries, please contact: CCP Box Office  (02)832-3704, (02)832-1125 loc. 1409 & 1406; Ticketworld  (02)891-9999

culturalcenterphilippines:

Ramon Obusan Folkloric Group
SAYAW AT GALAW RIZALIANA

Sayaw at Galaw Rizaliana is ROFG’s contribution to the nation’s celebration of Jose Rizal’s 150th birth anniversary. Drawing from the vast research of the late National Artist  for Dance, Ramon Arevalo Obusan, the performances will showcase through songs and dances the milieu Rizal was familiar with — from his childhood to his travels and writings.

Time: 8pm
Date: 05 August

Time: 3pm
Date: 06-07 August

Venue: Tanghalang Nicanor Abelardo (CCP Main Theater)

For tickets and inquiries, please contact: CCP Box Office (02)832-3704, (02)832-1125 loc. 1409 & 1406; Ticketworld (02)891-9999

(via culturalcenterphils)

A conversation with the Ilustrados

  • At a party of Filipinos in Madrid, Spain, 1882:
  • Ilustrado 1: Kuntento na ang mga Pilipino sa nakagawiang sistema, maski magtiis siya. Mas mahirap para sa kanya ang magbago.
  • Rizal: Para sa kanya o para sa inyo?
  • Ilustrado 2: Mga kasama, sa tingin ko'y tama ang kaibigan nating si Rizal.
  • Ilustrado 1: Parati naman siyang tama eh. (The crowd laughs, Rizal falls silent.)
  • Ilustrado 3: Mga kasama, pag nakialam tayo, baka magalit ang Espanya sa atin.
  • Ilustrado 1: Eh, pasalamat nga tayo na kahit dito'y nakakapunta tayo at nakakakuha ng edukasyon... at marami pang mga *ibang* bagay. (The crowd laughs again)
  • Rizal: Edukasyon, edukasyon... para lalo kayong magpakaduwag. (Silence) Kuntento na ba kayo sa habang panahon na nagpapaalipin? Hangga't hindi tayo natututong gumalang sa ating mga sarili, kailanman ay hindi tayo igagalang ng ibang lahi!
  • From the movie "Jose Rizal" (1998) by Marilou Diaz-Abaya
In celebration of the 103rd Year of the Foundation of the University of the Philippines, the Office of the Chancellor of the UP Diliman through the Office for Initiatives in Culture and the Arts, in cooperation with the College of Home Economics and the College of Arts and Letters presents:”Sulyap sa Baro at Saya: Silayan ang Saya de Kola" (17 June - 27 August 2011, Main Exhibition Hall)”Rizal at UP”(17 June - 30 July 2011, Atelyer)
The exhibitions are in celebration of the 50th year of the UP Diliman College of Home Economics and the sesquicentennial of the birth of Jose Rizal.
* Museum hours:Tuesdays - Fridays 10am to 6pmSaturdays 10am to 2pm View high resolution

In celebration of the 103rd Year of the Foundation of the University of the Philippines, the Office of the Chancellor of the UP Diliman through the Office for Initiatives in Culture and the Arts, in cooperation with the College of Home Economics and the College of Arts and Letters presents:

Sulyap sa Baro at Saya: Silayan ang Saya de Kola
(17 June - 27 August 2011, Main Exhibition Hall)

Rizal at UP
(17 June - 30 July 2011, Atelyer)


The exhibitions are in celebration of the 50th year of the UP Diliman College of Home Economics and the sesquicentennial of the birth of Jose Rizal.

* Museum hours:
Tuesdays - Fridays 10am to 6pm
Saturdays 10am to 2pm

indio-bravo:

El Canto de Maria Clara (or Canto Patriotico de Maria Clara) by Jose Rizal

This is a rendition by the Filipino band The Camerawalls (formed by the singer-guitarist Clementine, who by the way was the songwriter behind one of my favorite bands before called Orange and Lemons), the lyrics of the song comes from a very sad poem sung by Rizal’s character, Maria Clara in Noli Me Tangere (Chapter 23).

The song goes like this:

Dulces las horas en la propia patria
Donde es amigo cuanto alumbra el sol,
Vida es la brisa que en sus campos vuela,
Grata la muerte y más tierno el amor!

Ardientes besos en los labios juegan,
De una madre en el seno al despertar,
Buscan los brazos a ceñir el cuello,
Y los ojos sonríense al mirar.

Dulce es la muerte por la propia patria,
Donde es amigo cuanto alumbra el sol;
Muerte es la brisa para quien no tiene
Una patria, una madre y un amor!

Sweet are the hours in one’s own country
Where all is friendly underneath the sun,
Sweet are the breezes from native ricefields,
Death less bitter, and love more sweetly won!

It is sweet there for the babe to waken
In his mother’s bosom; without guile
To seek her kisses and embrace her
While their eyes meet in a smile.

Sweet is death for one’s own country
Where all is dear underneath the sun
Death is the breeze for him who has not
Any country, mother, or one true Love!

Maria Clara chose to sing the song while her family and some relatives were waiting for a catch of fish beside the fishtrap. Noli Me Tangere reiterates the reaction of the crowd after Maria Clara sang the song:

“The voice died away, the song finished, the harp was mute, yet still they listened and no one clapped. The girls felt their eyes fill up with tears. Ibarra seemed vexed. The impassive streetsman kept his eyes in the distance.

Suddenly a thunderous noise was heard. The women screamed and stopped their ears. It was Albino, the ex-seminarian, who with all the strength of his lungs had blown a blast on the carabao horn trumpet. Laughter and liveliness returned and the eyes, which had filled with tears, turned playful once again.”

Sad isn’t it?

(Source: indiohistorian / Lilystars Records)

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